Stocking energy from renewable energy production machines 0
By braikar, 23-06-2014 - 20:46 in Arts, Infrastructure, Science, Technology

This is a problem that everyone faces when they try to fulfill their energy requirements by using renewable methods (solar panels, windmills etc.). The energy cannot be stocked, or at least no efficient way exists up to now, large batteries farms are needed and this is not useful at all, this can only be used at very small scales.
The solution I’m presenting now can be applied both at very large scales and very small scales. But most efficiently for very large scales applications. We must rely on the different boiling temperatures of materials. The technical aspects are not my problem, I don’t have the means to look in details into it, but the general idea is quite simple.
Let’s imagine a solar farm that can produce 50 MW at peak, but only 5-10 MW as a median production when the sun is not very strong. All that for a building requiring 20 MW of constant power.

The problem is evident, it will provide enough power to that building only during sunny days around noon time when the sun is strongest. And sadly that excess energy must either be sold to other users or just be discarded as it cannot be used.

The large scale solution is to have large pools of water for example that are heated as much as possible during peak efficiency with the excess energy. When the solar produced energy goes below the needed requirements of 20 MW, all the excess energy is available as heat saved inside these pools. Now we can use 2 different methods together to convert that stored heat into usable electricity.
Assuming the water has been heated to 80°C degrees, we’ll need an element that has a vaporization temperature around 40°C, by subjecting that element in a closed circuit it will instantly vaporize and the steam can be used to power turbines as is done in all nuclear, charcoal, gas etc. powerplants. This element has to remain in a closed loop so that it is not wasted by letting it go into the atmosphere and instead as it condenses goes back into a reservoir to be used once again at another occasion, or until such time as the water pool temperature has gone so low as to not be able to trigger the boiling of that element.
By the same method we can use many different elements, that have increasingly lower and lower boiling temperatures in closed loops to successively run turbines until a point where the heat stored inside the water pools is almost gone.

On top of these systems we can use peltier plates plates in between places of different temperatures, for example between the main pool and the closed loops, or even between different parts of the same closed loop (beginning when it’s hotter and end when it’s cooler and condensed), to use the temperature differences efficiently to once again generate some more power with these temperature differentials.

That’s about it, now we just need engineers to look at the specific details to put such systems in place for large scale renewable energy plants. This can obviously also be used for wind farms, combines solar/wind farm, geothermic installations, hydroelectric farms etc.

Need I add, why do we only have horizontal wind farms?? Simple poles with wind turbines turning on a vertical axis would be much more efficient than huge poles with horizontal mills that have to follow the direction of the wind, a vertical axis windmill is always able to catch wind coming from any direction.